Why Learning to Code Is About More Than Code

Why Learning to Code Is About More Than Code

There are more than 300 coding schools in roughly 69 cities across the United States and Canada.  In 2016, those coding schools were projected to graduate more than 18,000 students. So, for people who are interested in enrolling in a coding school, there is no shortage of options.

A number of important criteria should be considered when evaluating coding school options, but one important factor is what a coding school curriculum offers beyond learning to code. At JRS Coding School, we structure our learning in a way that simulates and prepares students for life after coding school.

Your job as a developer will require communication with your peers and colleagues, clients, vendors, and others. In some instances, you may need to explain the benefit of your code to business stakeholders, while in others, you may need to help a fellow team member fix a problem or glitch in their code. These are very different conversations, and you need to be successful in both.

Related: Download the Course Syllabus for JRS Coding School’s 12-week immersive JavaScript boot camp.

Many people still consider coders to be isolated professionals who go to their desks in the morning and only see daylight at lunchtime or when they go home. In reality, coding is a dynamic, collaborative environment, so we emphasize communication skills development at JRS. JRS Coding School graduates learn not only how to write code but also how to communicate about code and its benefits and relevance to their colleagues. The JRS Coding School curriculum incorporates pair- and group-programming, and forces students to effectively communicate through a variety of methods. The goal with these projects is to simulate a real work environment.

“Many people still consider coders to be isolated professionals who go to their desks in the morning and only see daylight at lunchtime or when they go home. In reality, coding is a dynamic, collaborative environment.”

We also teach our students the tools they will use in a work environment, like GitHub. When developers write code, they must consider both that the system or the computer executing the system that has to understand that code and that the developer’s ‘future self’ and team members need to understand the code as well. GitHub, a communications collaboration tool for developers, provides developers with a place to document both code and processes.

Related: Three JRS Students from the Fall 2016 class describe the biggest surprise they encountered when enrolling, including JRS’ emphasis on group programming.

So if you’re thinking about enrolling in one of the hundreds of coding schools in North America, be sure to ask about the skills you’ll learn beyond learning to code. At JRS Coding School, we make sure our students are equipped for a rewarding career as developers, and that means teaching them to be a good coders and valuable employees and teammates.

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